App Development Description

App Development Main Event:

Event Description: 

Teams of 2-4 students will design and program a multi-screen app prototype that addresses a need/problem relevant to today’s youth. Students will create a proposal with a “paper prototype” of their app (View support document here), and then create a working prototype of their app using code.org’s App Lab (View app lab support video here on code.org). At the tournament, students will present their app to a panel of judges in a shark tank style event. Final project must be converted to a PDF file and INCLUDE the app url before uploading to the TOT App Submission Portal no later than 10:00 pm on March 6, 2020.

Common Core Standards: 

ELA-CC

K-12 CS

4C’s

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.1

2-AP-11

Communicate

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.2

2-AP-15

Collaborate

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.8.7

2-AP-18

Critically Think

 

2-IC-20

Create

 

Designing and Creating your Project: 

The process of creating your project should take on the following steps: 

 

  • Define your problem or need. What problem for teens will your app solve?


  • Prepare and research all aspects of the problem. Ask peers what they would like to see in such an app. See if there are any other apps that have attempted to solve this problem. Use the Research Sheet provided.
  • Try by designing your paper prototype first. Then build the prototype in app lab and have others try it out as well.
  • Reflect on what worked and didn’t. Define new problems that popped up and begin to improve your app.

 Technical Requirements: 

Final project must be submitted by 10:00 pm by March 6, 2020, to the TOT Project Submission Portal

  • If owner is under 13, make sure teacher turns on sharing permissions.
  • App must be a minimum of 3 screens, there is no maximum. Example—Home screen with app title, help screen, interactive screen.
  • App needs to be interactive—navigation menu should work, all buttons used should provide feedback when used.
  • Every screen should have a navigation menu to at least return to home screen.
  • There should be at least one screen where the user inputs information.
  • At least 5 different UI elements are used throughout the app
  • Utilize background colors, fonts, and font colors
  • Utilize icons, pictures and other graphics.

Reward Points: (see rubric for detailed breakdown):

25pts

Proposal Document with Paper Prototype:
Write a proposal explaining your problem, why this is a problem, and how your app will help solve the problem. Include photos (or scans) of your paper prototype sheets, and include the link to your app on code.org

15pts

Programming(making it all work):
In code.org’s app lab, use event blocks to make your buttons and other interactive elements work when clicked or used. **Note** some features of the app may be too advanced to code at this point, such as a gps signal in a google map. You can still include advanced features like maps by importing a picture of the feature instead. Programming points will be based solely on buttons, navigation, and screen switching.

20pts

UI elements and Design:
Use multiple UI elements, icons, pictures and other graphics. Use color, font and font sizes. Be aware of layout design and ease of use.

40pts

Live Challenge: The live challenge is a 3-5 minute shark tank style proposal or pitch. You may choose to use presentation software, posters, or other visual aids as needed.

Getting Help: 

Visit the Coding Documents Page to view Event support files and sample Live Challenges to help prepare and practice.

Contact Alaina Tudman at Alaina.Tudman@fresnounified.org if you have any further questions about this event.


App Development Live Challenge:

Scenario:

Your team of developers have been asked to design a new app to help humanity. You have been given several weeks to research potential issues and discover ways to use technology to solve these problems. You and your team have now been invited to share your findings and app design at a board member meeting. If you pitch this right, they will buy your app and market it for you. You have 5 minutes to convince them to buy your app and only your app.  

Challenge:

  • Design an app and create your write up ahead of time
  • Use any presentation software of your choosing to showcase your app. (PowerPoint, Google Slides, Sway, Prezi, and many others)
  • Make your presentation informative and convincing for the judges.
  • Be prepared to answer any other questions the judges have about your app.

Time:

  • 3-5 minutes to present your app idea to the judges
  • 3 minutes to answer any other questions the judges may have about your app

Scoring:

You will receive up to:

 10 pts

Research summarized and explained

 10 pts

Examples of the app displayed (could be photos, video, or live demo, etc)

 10 pts

Why they should buy (choose) your app over others (your pitch)

 10 pts

Incorporating all team members into the presentation.

 

Tips:

Practice your presentation many times in front of many different people. Use a timer to make sure you stay within the allotted time, as the judges will stop you if you go over.

Getting Help: 

Visit the Coding Event Documents Page to view Event support files for Scratch and sample Live Challenges to help prepare and practice.

Contact Alaina Tudman at Alaina.Tudman@fresnounified.org if you have any further questions about this event. 


App Development Reward Points:


Scoring Breakdown Description / Formula Max Points
Online Design Document 60
Live Event Live Challenge 40
Design Document Scoring Rubric
Category Exemplary Proficient Partially Proficient Incomplete

The problem the students are solving is clearly defined.

Proposal states the problem clearly, defines any constraints the problem has, and who has the problem (demographics).

One of the following criteria is not present: stated problem, constraints defined, demographics.

2 or more criteria are not present: problem, constraints defined, demographics.

Section Missing.

Describe and research of the problem, including user wants/needs.

Proposal shows in depth research, including citing facts and statistics related to the problem and data obtained from potential users regarding needs/wants, via survey or other means.

Proposal shows some research involved in the process, may be missing citations, or user data.

Proposal shows little to no research involved in the process.

Section Missing.

Explain and describe the paper prototype. Include photos of the paper prototype.

Photos of the paper prototype are inserted. Description of how the prototype will work. Students include arrows or other means to show expected flow between buttons/screens.

Some photos and an attempt to explain how the prototype will work, only minor details are unclear.

Explanation of how the prototype will work leaves the reader unclear or with questions regarding functionality; there are no photos to supplement.

Section Missing.

Include screen shots of your digital prototype on code.org with working URL to the digital prototype.

Multiple snips of the digital version are included and captioned, explaining how it works. Includes a working hyperlink to the app itself.

Some or few snips of the digital version are included. Explanation may be lacking. Hyperlink may not be linked properly.

A link to the app was not included; the app is not explained well and there are no photos/snips.

Section Missing.

Discuss new problems and next steps for this app.

Reflection discusses any new issues that came up during testing and what the next steps will be.

Reflection does not discuss next steps.

There is little to no reflection section.

Section Missing.

UI elements are used within the app for interactivity purposes.

5 or more different UI elements are in the app, making the app highly interactive for the user.

3 or 4 different UI elements are in the app, making it somewhat interactive.

1-2 different UI elements are in the app, making it barely interactive.

No UI Elements.

Elements are placed in locations that promote ease of use for the user.

The app was very easy to use; finding a screen or specific buttons did not take excessive time.

The app was not difficult to use; finding a screen or specific button may have taken extra time.

The app was difficult to use, finding a screen or specific buttons was impossible.

No UI Elements.

App has consistent colors and theme through all screens.

Background colors, fonts, and font colors work together to give the app a finished look and help with visibility.

Background colors, fonts, and font colors do not work well together (regarding visibility).

The app is black text and white background.

No App.

App is a minimum of 3 different screens.

The app has 3 or more screens.

The app has 2 screens.

The app has one screen.

No App.

All buttons when pressed/clicked produce an output

All buttons when pressed/clicked produce an output (outputs may vary).

Most buttons when pressed/clicked produce an output.

Some/few buttons when clicked produce an output.

No buttons work.

You are able to navigate to and from each screen.

There is an obvious navigation menu located somewhere on each screen; It is possible to navigate to any screen from any screen.

There is a clear home and help button on every screen. Inability to navigate to and from some of the screens.

Navigation only works one direction, or not at all.

Navigation does not work.
Live Challenge Scoring Rubric
Category Exemplary Proficient Partially Proficient Incomplete


The presentation included cited research into their problem. The presenter(s) were knowledgeable and explained the research thoroughly.

The presentation explained the problem, but key details were missing. The presenter(s) explained the research moderately.

The presentation was lacking an explanation on research or was very unclear.

Research was not discussed in the presentation.


The presentation had clear examples of the working app, either through pictures, video, or live demo.

The presentation showed only some parts of the app.

The presentation showed very little of the app made.

The presentation did not show the app.


The presenter(s) made a clear and convincing argument as to why their team’s app was the best choice.

The presenter(s) made a good argument as to why their team’s app was the best choice.

The presenter(s) made a poor argument for their app.

The presenter(s) did not actually pitch their app.


All team members participated equally during presentation.

All team members participated, but not equally.

One team member did not speak during presentation.

2 or more team members did not speak.